Oh! the confusing case of pointing a finger

Oh! the confusing case of pointing a finger
My
youngest daughter’s Christmas vacations started from today and like most
ignorant Dads, I was foolish to jump out of my bed at 05.30 hours on my mobile
phone alarm and run across to her room to wake her up.
The
poor child was deep in her sleep when I snooped upon her like the Lady Tremaine
and startled her out of her Cindrella dreams.
Absolutely
oblivious of her plans to be in slumber till midday, she opened her eyes wide
to stare at me for once and showed me her little pinky finger and went back to
sleep. The communication, though in gesture, was quite loud and clear. She had
conveyed to me that she is “Katti” with me.
My
misadventure was soon cut short by my wife, who had got up too, and in no
polite terms, told me to leave the poor kid alone and let her enjoy her sleep
as her festive season has already started.
I
immediately went back memory lane and remembered how this tiny little gesture
of pointing the fingers by our friends decided whether it made or ruined our
day. The little finger pointed meant “Katti” which conveyed that they are not
in talking terms with us anymore. We would wait for the day when these friends
would decide to change their sequence of fingers to point towards us, the day
they would lift their middle finger and pointer in unison and convey the
“Mitthi” or “Bucchi” (reference depending upon which place in the country we
were), which eventually meant that we were back in their good books.
Pointing
a finger has various connotations. Its meaning may vary according to the finger
which is pointed and the occasion in which it is done.
A thumbs up or thumbs down is a common hand gesture represented by a closed fist held with the  thumb extended upward or
downward in approval or disapproval respectively.
However, I have read that “Thumbs up”
traditionally translates as the foulest of gesticular insults in some Middle
Eastern countries — the most straightforward interpretation is ‘Up yours, pal!’.
In some countries, it is traditionally an obscene gesture, equivalent to the
use of the middle finger in the Western world.
In our country, although the gesture is well accepted, similar
gestures have negative connotations, and we need to be ultra-careful while
using this finger to denote our gesture. If while doing a thumbs up, if the
hand is wagged from side to side in a reverse-pendulum like movement, it means
“won’t work” or “disagree”. Kids show the thumb to a person
and say “thengaa,” sometimes followed making a face, drawing the
tongue out and touching the chin with it. It indicates cocking a snook at someone. And corporate
employees swear by this gesture to call someone
“angoothachaap”(thumb-print) implying that we are insulting him/her
as an illiterate person.

Adopted
all across the world from the western culture, pointing the middle finger
is an obscene hand gesture, often meaning the phrase “xxxx you” or
“up yours”. Performed by showing the back of the hand, extending the middle finger of the hand upwards while bending the other fingers down into the palm, it
is considered as a gesture and symbol of Taunt, disgrace and insult.

The
index finger is generally used as a pointer to specifically point out anything
specifically, more widely now used in books and publications. Yeah, it is also
widely used by Umpires during cricket matches, to signal “out” or a “free-hit”.

The sign of the horns is a hand gesture,
formed by extending the index and little fingers while holding the middle and ring fingers down with the thumb, is generally done when confronted with unfortunate events,
mostly of superstitious nature, like when a black cat crosses one’s path, when seeing a hearse (whether or not it is loaded), or when encountering any
person believed to bring about bad luck. Oh! Yeah,with fingers down, it is a
common gesture instead, by which superstitious people seek protection in
unlucky situations (something like touching wood).

The pointing of the pinky finger, apart from the “katti”
is also commonly used in our country to indicate that one has to visit the loo.
And here too, depending upon the nature of relief one seeks at the loo, the
fingers change, commonly referred to as going for “one number” and two number”.

As
till the end of the day, when I come back and see the smiling face of my little
princess, I shall keep my fingers crossed.

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